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Jan 25th
Home Community General Community A Big Apple’s Tale of Three Filipino Ladies and a Gentleman
A Big Apple’s Tale of Three Filipino Ladies and a Gentleman PDF Print E-mail
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Communities - General Community
Thursday, 29 January 2009 05:26

Dateline New York by Copper Sturgeon AKA Cobre de las Pescas

 

L ast Friday night (Jan. 23, 2009),  I met Dr. Vilma L. Labrador at the Philippine Consulate in New York City. She is the visiting Philippine Undersecretary of Education and chairwoman of the National Commission on Culture and the Arts (NCCA). She spoke to Filipino-American teacher groups here in the tri-state area, trying to entice them to do "Balik-Turo" in the Philippines. It turns out that one of the teachers' groups has been doing it since the 1990s. They volunteer during their vacations to teach (as unpaid volunteers) in various schools of the Philippines for short terms. (The visiting teachers do instructions in math, science and other subjects.)

 

Dr. Labrador seems to be a mover and dedicated Filipino leader, although I can only judge from what I heard that night. I introduced our group, the “Bakas Pilipinas/Philippine Historic Preservation Society,” to her.

 

Editor’s Note: Please read more
about Undersecretary Labrador in this article:

Press Conference and Reception Slated for Visiting RP Education Undersecretary Labrador on Jan. 27th

 

L ast week I also met Ms. Vicky Garchitorena, the president of Ayala Foundation. She is quite impressive. She offered to channel any funding we get for “Bakas Pilipinas” through her foundation (for a 5% administration fee), since they have a tax-exempt status. Part of their service to non-profits is that they do all the tax reporting and accounting, plus they monitor the funds to make sure they are used for their intended purposes. Coupled with the Ayala Foundation's track record and prestige, hopefully, people will be more encouraged to donate funds. It was a good meeting and the “Bakas Pilipinas” people told her that they would see how they could work with her.

 

Editor’s Note: To read more about the Ayala Foundation
and Ms. Garchitorena, please click on these links:

 

Honor Thy Mother and Father
(by Victoria P. Garchitorena in Columns / Op-Ed Page)

 

Many Freedoms Remain Elusive to the Filipino People
(by Victoria P. Garchitorena in Columns / Op-Ed Page)

 

AF USA Volunteer Bags Two Distinguished Awards. And Updates on Typhoon Frank

 

Holiday Greetings from Ayala Foundation USA!
(by Victoria P. Garchitorena in Communities / General Community)

 

A nother event last week was a forum on "Social Entrepreneurship and Strategic Philanthropy in the Philippines" sponsored by the Asia Society at its New York headquarters. I could not attend it but my associate, Ms. Anna, did and she took notes for me. Three people were on the panel: Vicky Garchitorena, Loida Nicolas Lewis and Diosdado Banatao.

 

Ms. Lewis is the Filipino-American multi-millionaire and philanthropist. She is also the CEO of TLC Beatrice, of Tropicana Orange Juice, etc. Dr. Banatao is the CEO of Tallwood Venture Capital. Both Mr. Banatao and Ms. Lewis are members of the Board of the Ayala Foundation—USA.

Editor's Note: Here is a YouTube feature on Dr. Banatao: &feature=PlayList&p=83BC6B10856B690F&playnext=1&index=3" href="/&feature=PlayList&p=83BC6B10856B690F&playnext=1&index=3">&feature=PlayList&p=83BC6B10856B690F&playnext=1&index=3 
 

T hey were each asked questions by a moderator. Ms. Anna said Vicky Garchitorena had the best answers.


Ms. Loida's answers were surprising. Are you are aware that she is supposed to be a very smart Harvard-educated lawyer? Asked what advice the panel members could give to alleviate poverty in the Philippines, Ms. Lewis said we should help educate Filipinos, so they can get out of there, since it is an over-populated country anyway. ??HUH??? Asked what kind of training Filipinos should get, she said since they are a caring people, they should be trained in care-giving (which Ms. Anna translated to "nannies and domestics"). HUH???

 

O ne of the questions was about alleviating poverty and saving the environment. The American gentleman of Filipino descent, Mr. Banatao, said: “Forget the environment if poverty is the focus. It is impossible to deal with the environment and poverty at the same time.” President Obama (and this writer) would totally disagree with.

 

Ms. Loida, who hails from Sorsogon Province, on the other hand said that all the polluting industries may be located anywhere in the Philippines – just stay out of Sorsogon. Then when the economy gets better, people can go to Sorsogon, which would be clean and pristine. (As if pollution does not travel and does not affect other areas. As we know, the issues are all interrelated).

 

Of course I disagree with Ms. Loida’s positions. # # #

 

Editor’s Notes: Copper Sturgeon and readers may like to read
this article in order to understand better Ms. Loida Nicolas-Lewis,
who is the favorite manay of the www.mabuhayradio.com editor:
How Loida Lewis Got Dubbed “Snow White(wash)” and then “CinderLoida” in Ongoing NaFFAA Soap Opera

 Manay is the Bicolano and Sorsoganon equivalent of Manang (older sister or kin).
This term of endearment is used even by people who not related to each other.
It is a title of respect. Bobby Reyes and Ms. Lewis were childhood friends.
If readers will type in “Loida Nicolas" in this website’s “Search this Site” button,
its database will report about 40 entries (replies).



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Last Updated on Tuesday, 10 February 2009 16:59
 

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