Forgot your password?
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
  • default color
  • green color
  • red color

MabuhayRadio

Thursday
Jul 18th
Home Sections Health and Medicine A Filipino Physician Comments on the "Desperate Housewives" Brouhaha
A Filipino Physician Comments on the "Desperate Housewives" Brouhaha PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 2
PoorBest 
Sections - Health and Medicine
Saturday, 06 October 2007 07:45

Part 7 of "Should We Do Desperate Moves About the Supposed "Desperate Housewives" Slur on RP's Med Schools?"

By Mon Ramirez (as posted in the Botomo@yahoogroups.com)

Here is a comment from one doctor, a product of a medical school in the Philippines, putting the remark in context. (Editor's Note: The Filipino physician chose not to reveal his identity. We decided to publish this Filipino doctor's remarks, as his explanations seem some of the most-prudent views that could never be termed as just another "grandstanding" attempt.)


Context, context, context.  Yes, context is very important.  First of all, let it be clear that I am a product of one of these "medical schools in the Philippines" this Susan character was talking about.  So here's the context . . .

If (big IF) the writer knows details about medical education is in the U.S. and how training hospitals subsequently look at potential recruits then it is obvious he/she was trying to denigrate a particular group of physicians, but it is not necessarily all or just any physician trained in "some medical school from the Philippines". 

The doctor (in the "Desperate Housewives" episode) did not even look Filipino at all. Aha, that is actually the most important part of the context. Should we not ask, "Why, for instance, would it enter her mind at all that he might have finished in some school other than where he is from?"  Yes, that is actually the key. 

So why would a white guy (presumably American) study somewhere else outside of the U.S.?  Because some Americans do complete their medical education outside of the U.S., mostly in medical schools in the Caribbean and some in the Philippines (less now but more in past decades).  The Philippines has been a favorable alternative because medical education is patterned after the U.S. (in contrast to India – the largest exporter of physicians- where it is patterned after British medical education). "But why go outside the U.S.?" you may ask again.

(#1) Some for financial reasons (it is cheaper in Grenada or the Philippines).

(#2) Some because they have roots and/or relatives in the Philippines (and I have friends who have done this).

(#3) And some because they have not been able to pass entrance into U.S. medical schools.

Essentially, I think Susan's character was trying to put down the third category of physicians (I have seen it happen).  It is still a slur and still an unnecessary one. This has some objectionable implications though, does it not? You mean American students who cannot get into American medical schools are actually able to graduate from other country's medical schools, including the Philippines? Yes, that's just the reality.

For the record, I personally know some American IMGs who are clinically more competent and more compassionate than their Ivy-League counterparts (and vice versa). The bottom line: It takes years of experience and more than just the medical school you come from to make a good physician.

My attempt to explain the context above is of course moot since the Filipino community has obviously taken the slur personally.  Besides, even if the (script) writer's intent is what I theorize above— i.e., to question the aptitude of the doctor because he might not have passed in an American school and had to go overseas—it is still an unnecessary insult. Susan could have simply asked to see those diplomas "to see what medical school you come from." Period-- hanggang doon na lang sana ang tanong and no one gets insulted.

It is probably good that the Filipino community took it personally. Overall, though there are some hilarious, overboard, overacting responses (like some Filipino congressmen or Filipino senators demanding a move and/or response from the U.S. government—teka hindi naman government-owned ang ABC ha)—I think the rapid and overwhelming response from the Filipino community shows how we could flex (political) muscles. The whole controversy came up because some Caucasian physicians have not been able to pass entrance into U.S. medical schools. Essentially, I think Susan's character was trying to put down the third category of physicians (I have seen it happen). It is still a slur and still an unnecessary one. 

This has some objectionable implications though, does it not? You mean American students who cannot get into American medical schools are actually able to graduate from other country's medical schools, including the Philippines? Yes, that's just the reality. # # #

 



Related news items:
Newer news items:
Older news items:

Last Updated on Monday, 15 October 2007 02:13
 

Add your comment

Your name:
Your email:
Subject:
Comment (you may use HTML tags here):

Quote of the Day

"I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three."--Elayne Boosler