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Home Sections Humor & Satire Top Twelve Reasons Why Manny Pacquiao Lost to Floyd Mayweather, Jr.
Top Twelve Reasons Why Manny Pacquiao Lost to Floyd Mayweather, Jr. PDF Print E-mail
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Sections - Humor & Satire
Written by Goliath Letterrman   
Sunday, 03 May 2015 08:07


The World Must Realize that the Pacman Is a Multi-tasking Entrepreneur and Not Just a Mere Boxer

By Goliath Letterman

Dateline Las Vegas, NV, May 3, 2015, Coconut News Network (CNNkuno.com)

H ere are the top 12 reasons why Manny Pacquiao lost to Floyd Mayweather, Jr., in their much-awaited fight at Las Vegas, NV, last night (May 2nd):


12. Pacman was thinking during the first round if he could entice Floyd Mayweather, Jr. in putting up a partnership to buy a team in the National Basketball Association (NBA) so that he could coach it.

11. Pacman spent the second round looking for his Mom Dionesia and check if she was praying the Holy Rosary, all 15 decades of it.

10. Manny Pacquiao started to use his new footwork during the third round that his choreographer said could land him in the "Dancing with the Stars" television show.

9.  Pacman wondered during the fourth round if a defeat to Mayweather will affect his senatorial bid in the May 2016 national elections in the Philippines.

8. Pacquiao spent the fifth round in trying to compose a new song about Las Vegas being the "Sin City" that he would sing with his MP band as they perform live on national television in the Philippines.

7.  Pacquiao used most of the three minutes of Round Six in thinking if he could entice Floyd Mayweather and Oscar de la Hoya in making a Filipino version of the "Good, the Bad and the Ugly" movie that his Pacquiao Films Corporation would produce with him getting the lead role, aside from being the film executive producer, script writer and director.

6.  Pacman spent Round Seven in thinking if his public-relations contractor could land him a guest appearance on Monday night (May 4th) in the David Letterman's show at CBS before he (Mr. Letterman, who is not related to this writer) would retire.

5.  Round Eight saw the Pacman thinking if he could persuade boxing authorities to adopt the "three-second rule" in professional basketball to prevent the "Rope-a-dope" stance in the boxing ring.

4. Pacman used most of the minutes of Round Nine thinking that if he became the Philippine President in 2022 if he could entice the boxing universe to make Metro Manila the "boxing capital of the world."

3.  Pacquiao used Round 10 in winking at the more-than 200-person entourage (composed of some of his fellow congressmen, kibitzers and court jesters, etcetera, etcetera ad infinitum) and thinking of the post-fight party at a Las Vegas hotel where they can have all the wine, woman entertainers and wusic, oops, music.

2.  Pacman used a lot of the minutes of Round 11 in thinking if his promoter, Atty. Bob Arum, can also become his tax lawyer in fixing his tax problems with the Bureau of Internal Revenue of the Philippines, which is trying to collect from him billions of pesos in alleged back taxes. And finally ...

1.  Pacquiao spent all the minutes of the final round in thinking whether migrating to Laos can become an option if he fails to become a senator in the May 2016 Philippine elections and where, as an "Adopted" Laos-na-yan, oops, Laotian, he could use better its capital of Vientiane as the venue of his acting, basketball, boxing, dancing, entertainment, film production, political and singing-recording ventures, if not what is left of his multi-tasking expertise. # # #



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Last Updated on Sunday, 03 May 2015 09:01
 

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