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Home Sections Politics “Oplan NO-EL” Is Back on the Drawing Boards
“Oplan NO-EL” Is Back on the Drawing Boards PDF Print E-mail
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Sections - Politics
Written by Bobby M. Reyes   
Sunday, 11 October 2009 09:10


T he Advent Season is still two months away and yet presidential whiz kids at the Office of the Philippine President are already singing the Christmas ditty, “Noel, Noel . . .” The Oplan NO-EL stands for “No Elections.”

 

It looks like President Arroyo has found another excuse to delay or cancel the 2010 presidential elections. She has found actually excuses (plural). Like the recent typhoons, floods and landslides. Then there is the “brownout” reason.

 

Primarily because of the recent natural calamities as proximate causes, Philippine Energy Secretary Angelo Reyes (not related to this writer) will reiterate, if not reconfirm, his earlier announcement that the Philippines should anticipate the return of the 1992-era brownouts. There is projected a massive series of brownouts in 2010. Since the government cannot even guarantee supply of ample amount of electricity, how can the state-of the-art computers acquired for billions of pesos for the May 2010 elections operate without electrical power?

 

It is public knowledge that President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and her clique have a Plan B about delaying or canceling the 2010 national-and-local elections. One scenario has been explained by our columnist, Ado Paglinawan, in his article, It Looks Like the 2010 Elections Will Be Canceled Or Postponed by the Arroyo Clique

 

W hich brings us to an October 2007 article about humor in Call Centers, as collected by our webmaster, Allan Albert, and found in this article, Call center, may I help you?

 

QUOTE.

This is a true story from the WordPerfect Helpline, which was transcribed from a recording monitoring the customer care department. Needless to say the Help Desk employee was fired; however, he/she is currently suing the WordPerfect organization for "Termination without Cause."

Actual dialogue of a former WordPerfect Customer Support employee.
(Now I know why they record these conversations!):

Operator:         "Ridge Hall, computer assistance; may I help you?"
Caller:              "Yes, well, I'm having trouble with WordPerfect." Operator:         "What sort of trouble??"
Caller:              "Well, I was just typing along, and all of a sudden the words went away."
Operator:         "Went away?"
Caller:              "They disappeared"
Operator:         "Hmm. So what does your screen look like now?"
Caller:              "Nothing."
Operator:         "Nothing??"

Caller:              "It's blank; it won't accept anything when I type."
Operator:         "Are you still in WordPerfect, or did you get out??"
Caller:              "How do I tell?"
Operator:         "Can you see the 'C: prompt' on the screen??"
Caller:              "What's a sea-prompt?"
Operator:         "Never mind, can you move your cursor around the screen?"
Caller:              "There isn't any cursor; I told you, it won't accept anything I type."
Operator:         "Does your monitor have a power indicator??"
Caller:              "What's a monitor?"
Operator:         "It's the thing with the screen on it that looks like a TV. Does it have a little light that tells you when it s on?
Caller:               "I don't know."
Operator:          "Well, then look on the back of the monitor and find where the power cord goes into it. Can you see that??"
Caller:              "Yes, I think so."
Operator:         "Great. Follow the cord to the plug, and tell me if it's plugged into the wall.
Caller:              "Yes, it is."
Operator:         "When you were behind the monitor, did you notice that there were two cables plugged into the back of it, not just one??"
Caller:               "No."
Operator:          "Well, there are. I need you to look back there again and find the other cable."
Caller:               "Okay, here it is."
Operator:           "Follow it for me, and tell me if it's plugged securely into the back of your computer."
Caller:               "I can't reach."
Operator:          "OK. Well, can you see if it is??"
Caller:               "No."
Operator:          "Even if you maybe put your knee on something and lean way over??"
Caller:               "Well, it's not because I don't have the right angle – it’s because it's dark."
Operator:          "Dark??"
Caller:               "Yes – the office light is off, and the only light I have is coming in from the window."
Operator:           "Well, turn on the office light then."
Caller:               "I can't."
Operator:          "No? Why not??"
Caller:               "Because there's a power failure."
Operator:           "A power .... A power failure? Aha. Okay, we've got it licked now. Do you still have the boxes and manuals and packing stuff that your computer came in?"
Caller:               "Well, yes, I keep them in the closet."
Operator:           "Good. Go get them, and unplug your system and pack it up just like it was when you got it. Then take it back to the store you bought it from."
Caller:                "Really? Is it that bad?"
Operator:           "Yes, I'm afraid it is."
Caller:                "Well, all right then, I suppose. What do I tell them??"
Operator:           "Tell them you're too stupid to own a computer!"

UNQUOTE.

 

And there is no truth to the nasty rumor that the “caller” in the preceding story now works for the Philippine Commission on Elections (COMELEC).

 

B ut on a serious note, an announcement about the postponement or cancellation of the May 2010 elections will lead to public protests (that others may even dub the “Parliament of the Streets). And more protests will pave the way for Mr. Paglinawan's prediction to happen. Therefore, if we follow Mr. Paglinawan’s scenario, the “NO-EL” Plan B looks doable.

 

Mr. Paglinawan wrote in his April 2009 article, It Looks Like the 2010 Elections Will Be Canceled Or Postponed by the Arroyo Clique, “Just as in the final months before Ferdinand Marcos' departure from Malacañang, the power elite, the corrupt brokers, the patronage politicians, in short, the scum of Philippine society and the oppressors of the people, are now creating all kinds of scenario leading to more of ‘status quo’."

And perhaps Mr. Paglinawan’s final prediction will happen: “President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo would leave
Malacañang Palace only in a horizontal position.” # # #


 



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Last Updated on Tuesday, 13 October 2009 11:33
 
Comments (3)
1 Tuesday, 08 December 2009 05:56
mabuhay
Tony Abaya writes also on the "NO-EL" (No Elections) Strategy of the Arroyo Administration:

Why Martial Law?
By Antonio C. Abaya
Written on Dec. 07, 2009
For the Standard Today,
December 08 issue

(Snipped) . . .
Martial law seems to be the joint idea of President Arroyo and Acting Defense Secretary Gonzales. Which rings alarm bells all over the place. It was Gonzales, as National Security Adviser, who proposed on at least two public occasions in the past eight months
the formation of a "transition revolutionary government" that will take over the reins of government, with the knowledge and consent of key sectors of society, including the Churches, the military and police, the business community, civil society, etc, with the active presence and participation of President Arroyo.

With such a transition revolutionary government in place, President Arroyo would remain in power beyond her presidential term, which ends on June 30, 2010. In other words, No-El, or no elections in 2010. Gonzales also envisaged that under this transition revolutionary government, Congress would push through Charter Change to shift to parliamentary, thus paving the way for Gloria Arroyo to become Prime Minister for Life. Gloria Forever!

Would this devilish plot succeed? That remains to be seen.. Under the 1987 Constitution, the president can impose martial law in case of invasion or rebellion, but for only 60 days, and it has to be approved by a joint session of Congress. While the PaLaKa coalition controls the political prostitutes in the Lower House, the Senate, which includes several presidential and vice-presidential contenders, would vigorously object to it. (Snipped . . .)

To read the column of Mr. Abaya in its entirety, please continue ...

Why Martial Law?
By Antonio C. Abaya
Written on Dec. 07, 2009

Malacanang's reaction to the Nov. 23 massacre in Maguindanao was at first slow and non-confrontational towards members of the Ampatuan political dynasty, who seem to have been the principal suspects for the grisly crime.

Presidential spokeswoman Lorelei Fajardo's statement that "I don't think the President's friendship with the Ampatuans will be severed…Just because they are in this situation doesn't mean we will turn our backs on them…" (Nov. 27, Inquirer) sounded like she was assuring the Ampatuan political clan of President Arroyo's undying loyalty to them, whatever their guilt or innocence may be in this multiple murder (57 dead) incident.

But public outrage, both here and abroad, has compelled Malacanang to change its softly-softly approach to the Ampatuans.

Gilbert Teodoro, presidential candidate and chairman of the PaLaKa ruling coalition, expelled the most high-ranking Ampatuans from the party, although it can be argued that PaLaKa needs the Ampatuans more than the Ampatuans need PaLaKa.

President Arroyo gave Interior Secretary Ronaldo Puno, whose office has jurisdiction over the Philippine National Police (PNP), authority to exercise administrative control over the entire Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), with powers to suspend or replace local government officials, as well as military and police officers, found implicated in the massacre. (Nov. 28, Inquirer).

Acting Defense Secretary Norberto Gonzales told the Inquirer (Dec. 1) that martial law need not be imposed in Maguindanao as government efforts to maintain the peace in the province were sufficient. "As of now, I think that whatever the government is doing is really effective….let' s see how the situation develops…"

But in the Manila Standard Today of the same date, Gonzales seems to be talking from another corner of his mouth: "We are open to all options, including martial law, for as long as these are within the ambit of the 1987 Constitution. We really need to take more drastic steps to really get the perpetrators of the massacre behind bars….I know some people have a negative perception of martial law, , but it will be more horrible if the masterminds of the massacre are able to get away because they are using our democratic processes and we did not do anything when our Constitution provides for an option…."

Armed with testimonies from witnesses, the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) of the PNP, asked the Department of Justice to file multiple murder cases (25, so far) against Datu Unsay Mayor Andal Ampatuan Jr. and four other members of his clan, as well as other officials of the local government. (Dec. 02, Inquirer).

While Ampatuan Jr is thrown into a detention cell of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) in Manila, the clan patriarch, Maguindanao Governor Andal Ampatuan Sr., and seven other members of his clan are indicted for their participation in the massacre, while 1,092 members of local police units are put under investigation. (Dec. 03, Inquirer).

A huge cache of arms is unearthed in an empty lot a few hundred meters from the Ampatuan mansion in Sharif Aguak town, capital of Maguindanao Province. Some of the weapons are said to bear the markings "Department of National Defense Arsenal", which means they are government-issue weapons. (Dec. 05, Inquirer). Fully armed troops and police have also descended on the various mansions of the Ampatuans in search of more weapons and other incriminating evidence.

Assuming these arms were not planted as evidence against the Ampatuans, it can only mean that whoever possessed (and buried) these weapons had acquired them illegally. This is not surprising. About three or four years ago, a European journalist who had the temerity to snoop around these dangerous places told me that one of his findings was that Philippine military personnel were selling their weapons to outlaws and private armies

At about the same time that these weapons caches were discovered, President Arroyo imposed martial law on Maguindanao Province, apparently without informing her point man in the field, DILG Secretary Puno, for the stated purpose of "arresting the Ampatuans.". "I don't know about that, unless they have done something that I don't know," said Puno, referring to the declaration of martial law. (Dec 05, Inquirer).

But as the above sequence of events shows, the government, acting through DILG Sec. Puno, has already done much of that. The suspected mastermind, Andal Ampatuan Jr. has been held in the NBI detention cell in Manila since Dec 01, together with four of his relatives. They have been, or are about to be, charged with 25 (so far) counts of murder. Without recourse to martial law.

The clan patriarch, Andal Ampatuan Sr., governor of the province, and seven other clan members have been indicted for complicity in the massacre, and 1,092 members of the local police are under investigation for possible involvement in the multiple murders.
Without recourse to martial law.

And all this was accomplished by Puno under his authority as civilian administrator of the province under emergency rule, without recourse to martial law. So why martial law at all?

Martial law seems to be the joint idea of President Arroyo and Acting Defense Secretary Gonzales. Which rings alarm bells all over the place. It was Gonzales, as National Security Adviser, who proposed on at least two public occasions in the past eight months
the formation of a "transition revolutionary government" that will take over the reins of government, with the knowledge and consent of key sectors of society, including the Churches, the military and police, the business community, civil society, etc, with the active presence and participation of President Arroyo.

With such a transition revolutionary government in place, President Arroyo would remain in power beyond her presidential term, which ends on June 30, 2010. In other words, No-El, or no elections in 2010. Gonzales also envisaged that under this transition revolutionary government, Congress would push through Charter Change to shift to parliamentary, thus paving the way for Gloria Arroyo to become Prime Minister for Life. Gloria Forever!

Would this devilish plot succeed? That remains to be seen.. Under the 1987 Constitution, the president can impose martial law in case of invasion or rebellion, but for only 60 days, and it has to be approved by a joint session of Congress. While the PaLaKa coalition controls the political prostitutes in the Lower House, the Senate, which includes several presidential and vice-presidential contenders, would vigorously object to it.

But, of course, any president who declares martial law is not likely to pay any attention to these constitutional niceties. He or she would go for broke and assume dictatorial powers, and to hell with the Senate and all who object to martial law.

Except that the Great Black Father in Washington DC would likely squash the Gonzales Plan right from the start. It is significant that US Ambassador Kristie Kenney has issued a statement the other day that the US government would closely monitor martial law in Maguindanao and that the 2010 elections should take place as scheduled.

The last time the US government issued a stern warning about these elections was last July when CIA Director Leon Panetta made a sudden flying visit to Manila to put his foot down on Oplan August Moon, under which PMA Class of 1978 was supposedly going to stage a military coup on August 06, to keep President Arroyo – an honorary member of Class '78 - in power beyond June 30, 2010.

President Arroyo's visit to the White House, originally scheduled to take place "end of 2009" was suddenly moved up to end of July, almost certainly also to warn her not to proceed with Oplan August Moon. There is no reason to believe that official Washington has become more benign towards her since.

So why martial law at this time and under these constraints, when there is clearly no rebellion and no invasion? Senator Rodolfo Biazon suspects that martial law is a way out for the Ampatuans. By charging them with rebellion, the Arroyo government gives them – her former political allies - wiggle room to wiggle out of multiple murders, which is legally absorbed by the higher crime of rebellion.

They can thus be acquitted of rebellion, which clearly does not and did not exist. Proof: the Ampatuans never raised the flag of rebellion, did not attack any offices of the provincial or national government, did not declare an independent state, did not foment street demos against the government in Manila. They are merely feudal warlords out to protect their turf against interlopers like the Mangudadatus.

Senator Nene Pimentel raised the possibility that martial was declared to enable the Arroyos to retrieve incriminating ballot boxes, possibly hidden in the Ampatuan mansions, from the 2004 and 2007 elections, which would prove massive cheating for her and her party in Maguindanao by the Ampatuans who have acquired notoriety as vote wholesalers. Maybe they will find Lintang Bedol's head in one of the ballot boxes.

Whatever the real reason for its declaration, the case for martial law is inherently weak. The Supreme Court will likely rule against it. By now President Arroyo must be wishing she had not imposed it. *****

Reactions to tonyabaya@gmail. com or tony_abaya@yahoo. com.

Other articles in www.tapatt.net and in acabaya.blogspot. com.
2 Wednesday, 16 December 2009 22:53
As I listened and observed the goings-on in Metro-Manila and the provinces -- I sense a disturbing trend among the Filipino electorate that there seems to be a burgeoning nationwide feeling that the May 10, 2010 Elections may not push through -- due to recent circumstances lurking in the psyche of Filipino voters -- and that may yet result in that dreaded "failure in election" on a national scale.

The actions recently taken by the Comelec in overturning the victories of Bulacan Governor Mendoza and Isabela Governor Grace Padaca -- exacerbated by Pampanga Governor "Among Ed" Panlilio's win being turned over too in the coming days in favor of Pampanga Jueteng queen Lillian Pineda -- evokes the ghost of another "Hello Garci" episode. BTW -- our DPP leadership and I visited Among Ed only last December 8 -- Feastday of the Immaculate Conception -- during a medical mission he pulled together in his former parish of Bettis, Pampanga. He intimated to us that such a turn-over is forthcoming -- unless he can come up with millions of pesos to contest such an expensive vote-recount.

Additionally, the recent Maguindanao massacre and the unearthing of countless voters' registration cards within the compounds of the Ampatuan's vast mansions and enormous properties -- along with the "presumed" displacement of millions of new voters in their respective precincts -- especially among the first-time Youth voters -- could well evoke such an election debacle. That GMA would win Pampanga's 2nd Congressional District is a "done deal." But whether or not she's going to take over the post of House Speaker -- and then on to becoming Prime Minister in a unicameral Philippine Congress -- with the Philippine Senate being obliterated and considered irrelevant - is being highly speculated by political pundits.

Be that as it may -- let's hope and pray it doesn't happen --- and that we would have truly a genuine, peaceful and orderly elections nationwide -- come May 10, 2010 Elections -- so that Democracy may yet live again in our land.

Ernie G. Ramos
Chairman, Democratic Party of the Philippines
3 Thursday, 17 December 2009 08:03
mabuhay
Comelec warned of dire consequences of ‘No Election’

By MARIO B. CASAYURAN

December 17, 2009, 5:28pm

Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile said Thursday that the Commission on Elections (Comelec), faced with problems of delayed deliveries of automated machines, must ensure clean, honest, and credible elections in 2010 whether it is done manually or through computerized voting, saying chaos could result if the elections do not push through as scheduled.

The Senate chief stressed this after Comelec officials, led by Commissioner Rene Sarmiento, attended a joint congressional oversight committee on automated elections, assured Senate officials that there would be computerized elections next year.

Sarmiento also assured the legislators that the Comelec is preparing contingency plans for the scheduled 2010 elections.

Comelec officials said in the event that the computers to be used in the automated polls do not arrive on time, they could start the shift from automated to manual elections at least two months before the May 10 elections.

Senator Francis ‘’Chiz’’ Escudero, co-chairman of the joint committee, maintained that Comelec officials must prepare for manual elections should a full or partial automated election is not possible.

The Smartmatic consortium, the principal contractor of the poll automation project, had failed in its three promises to make deliveries of some or even half of the 82,000 automated voting machines since November 15.

Cagayan de Oro city Rep. Rufus Rodriguez has asked for a copy of the Comelec-Smartmatic contract for legislators to check on the penalties should Smartmatic fail to deliver its automation project.

Rodriguez said the March 10 deadline set by Comelec to shift from automatic to manual is too long.

‘’Failure of no election would extend the terms of everybody,’’ Rodriquez, a former San Sebastian college of law dean, stressed.

Makati City Rep. Teodoro Locsin Jr., for his part told the poll officials not to throw the towel yet on automated elections, adding that the poll body ‘’should do its best.’’

Escudero was surprised to learn that it is possible that Smartmatic could evade sanctions should the automation do not push through because these re-settings of deadlines were mutually agreed upon by the parties.

In case the Comelec fails to implement an automated voting system, the poll body could draw needed funds to revert to manual elections from the P11 billion that Congress appropriated for the automated election project.

There is no need for an act of Congress to shift the mode of elections from automated to manual, Enrile explained.

Of the P11 billion election budget, P7 billion was earmarked for a fully automated voting system.

Enrile also said that he is against a partial automated election because it would open itself to allegations that those who led in the voting could be accused of having rigged the voting.

Stressing that a no-election situation in the country would be a ‘’very costly proposition,’’ Enrile said he is still hopeful that the Comelec would be able to undertake an automated election system.

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