Forgot your password?
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
  • default color
  • green color
  • red color

MabuhayRadio

Wednesday
Oct 23rd
Home Sections Politics Philippines Wants Newer U.S. Military Assets
Philippines Wants Newer U.S. Military Assets PDF Print E-mail
User Rating: / 1
PoorBest 
Sections - Politics
Monday, 27 June 2011 08:20

 

By JOSEPH G. LARIOSA

(© 2011 Journal Group Link International)

  

C HICAGO (jGLi) – The Philippines has sounded out Friday (June 24) to the United States a laundry list of “newer U.S. military assets, which the Philippines could acquire quicker but through a deliberate selection and, which hopefully, are more cost-effective.”

 

Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert F. del Rosario explored this possibility during a call at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., on U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who expressed readiness to help strengthen the Philippine maritime territory.

 

In a separate meeting by Secretary del Rosario with U.S. National Director for Intelligence (NDI) James Clapper in the morning, the U.S. official pledged to enhance the NDI’s intelligence-sharing with the Philippines to heighten the latter’s maritime situational awareness and surveillance in the West Philippine Sea.

 

Secretary del Rosario conveyed to U.S. defense officials that to complement the Excess Defense Articles (EDA), which the U.S. traditionally turns over to the Philippines, he is exploring an option to access “newer U.S. military assets which the Philippines could acquire quicker but through a deliberate selection and, which hopefully, are more cost-effective.”

 

HAPPY TO LOOK

 

In response, U.S. Defense Undersecretary for Policy Ms. Michelle Fluornoy said that “we would be happy to have our team look into the full range of (the Philippines’) requirements (for maritime security)” and stressed that “we should not allow this perception that you (referring to the Philippines) are alone and we’re not behind you.”

 

Clapper emphasized that the U.S. “has a long association” with the Philippines and “we’ll do whatever we can to help” even as he expressed concern over the recent incidents in the West Philippine Sea.

 

Del Rosario’s visit comes a day after paying a call on U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton who assured the visiting Filipino official that U.S. will consult closely with the Philippine government on ways to protect their shared interest in maintaining freedom of navigation, respect for international law, and unimpeded lawful commerce in the West Philippine Sea.

 

Invoking the provision of the Philippines-U.S. Mutual Defense Treaty, Secretary Clinton told Del Rosario that the United States will honor its commitment to the treaty that is marking its 60th anniversary this year.

 

Secretary Clinton said the Treaty signed in 1951 “continues to serve as a pillar of our relationship and a source of stability in the region.”

 

They agreed to consult closely on ways to protect their shared interest in maintaining freedom of navigation, respect for international law, and unimpeded lawful commerce in the West Philippine Sea.

 

CHINA ESCALATING CHALLENGES”

 

E arlier, Del Rosario told the Washington Post, “The situation is shaky out there. The intrusions are getting more aggressive. China has escalated its challenges in an area recently found to contain large deposits of natural gas. From frigates firing on our fishing boats, they’ve gone to harassing our exploration boats to bringing in platforms and posts.”

 

Del Rosario said he would like to get clarification from U.S. officials if the MDT “extends to offshore territory and for help in obtaining new patrol boats.”

 

At the meeting, Secretary del Rosario also conveyed to Secretary Clinton the Philippine government’s resolve to strengthen its capabilities to defend its maritime territory “because the Philippines is prepared to do what is necessary to stand up to any aggressive action in our backyard.”

 

He welcomed Secretary Clinton’s statement that the US “is determined and committed to supporting the defense of the Philippines, and that means trying to find ways of providing affordable material and equipment that will assist the Philippine military to take the steps necessary to defend itself.”

 

Secretary del Rosario stressed that international law, particularly the UNCLOS (UN Convention on the Law of the Sea) is the Philippine basis for defining its territory and maritime entitlements in the WPS. He briefed Secretary Clinton on the Philippines’ proposal on how to transform the WPS or SCS from a zone of dispute to a Zone of Peace, Friendship, Freedom and Cooperation (ZoFFP/C).

 

In both of Secretary Del Rosario's visits with Secretaries Clinton and Gates, he was accompanied by Philippine Ambassador to the U.S. Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. # # #

 

Editor’s Note: To contact the author, please e-mail him at: (lariosa_jos@sbcglobal.net)

 

 



Newer news items:
Older news items:

 

Add your comment

Your name:
Your email:
Subject:
Comment (you may use HTML tags here):

Quote of the Day

"I can't really remember the names of the clubs that we went to."-- Shaquille O'Neal on whether he had visited the Parthenon during his visit to Greece