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Home Sections The Daily B.R.E.A.D. Nov 16, 2009 - Monday Meditation (Radical Faith!)
Nov 16, 2009 - Monday Meditation (Radical Faith!) PDF Print E-mail
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Sections - The Daily B.R.E.A.D.
Sunday, 15 November 2009 04:32

I find myself begging for sight, to see the world as it really is, in all its beauty and all its misery, its love and its hate, and to see it through the eyes of Jesus.  I pray that I will never grow too tired, or cynical, or comfortable, to experience indignation in the face of yet another atrocity.  From the Maccabees to Jesus, and from Jesus to the Salvadoran martyrs, we have examples before us of those who persevered and paid the price.  Dare we pray to have that kind of radical faith?
   



Memorial of St. Roch Gonzalez, S.J.
1 Maccabees 1:10-15, 41-43, 54-57, 62-63
Psalm 119:53, 61, 134, 155, 158

L uke 18:35-43  As he drew near to Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging; (36) and hearing a multitude going by, he inquired what this meant. (37) They told him, "Jesus of Nazareth is passing by." (38) And he cried, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" (39) And those who were in front rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out all the more, "Son of David, have mercy on me!" (40) And Jesus stopped, and commanded him to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, (41) "What do you want me to do for you?" He said, "Lord, let me receive my sight." (42) And Jesus said to him, "Receive your sight; your faith has made you well." (43) And immediately he received his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God.



Meditation by Roger Bergman

The 20th Anniversary of the Salvadoran Martyrs

T oday is the twentieth anniversary of the assassinations of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her teenage daughter, at the University of Central America (UCA) in El Salvador, an institution of Christian inspiration that had made a preferential option for the poor, the vast majority of the country’s citizens .  But the martyrdoms of November 16, 1989, were hardly the first or only instances of persecution of the church and repression of movements for social change by the U.S.-supported armed forces of the Salvadoran government from the late 1970s into the early 1990s.  The litany of dead and disappeared, including the saintly and prophetic Archbishop Oscar Romero, as well as four U.S. women missionaries, is heartbreakingly long, numbering in the tens of thousands.

          
An infamous slogan of the day was “Be a patriot! Kill a priest!”  Women, including pregnant women, and children, including infants, were not spared.  Unspeakable massacres at the Rio Sumpul and in the village of El Mazote seemed intended to wipe out the next generation of peasants – potential “subversives” – and to terrorize the current generation into submission.
          
“In those days there appeared in Israel men who were breakers of the law, and they seduced many people,…abandoned the covenant,…and sold themselves to wrongdoing… Whoever was found with a scroll of the covenant…was condemned to death by royal decree.”  Apparently persecution of the righteous by the ruling powers is nothing new, as the story of the Maccabees in the second century before Christ makes clear.  “But many in Israel were determined and resolved in their hearts…[and] preferred to die rather than…to profane the holy covenant.”  And so was born the idea of religious martyrdom.
          
Faced with such inhumanity and idolatry, one cries out to God, with the Psalmist, “Indignation seizes me because of the wicked who forsake your law.”  One begs the Lord, “Redeem me from the oppression of men, that I may keep your precepts.”  When wicked men rule, as in the time of the Maccabees, or of Jesus, or of Romero and the UCA Jesuits, observing the commandments to love God and one’s neighbor as oneself becomes subversive and makes the righteous targets for violence.
          
In such a broken world, when the risen Jesus passes near, for what do you beg?  How do you respond to his question to the blind man of Jericho, “What do you want me to do for you?”
          
I find myself praying for the courage to sustain compassion when so many suffering people around the world and over my back fence cry out for justice and solidarity.  I find myself praying for the courage to be faithful to the covenant when it might be risky to speak out.  I find myself asking for mercy, since I know from long past experience that my courage will sometimes be found wanting.
          
I find myself begging for sight, to see the world as it really is, in all its beauty and all its misery, its love and its hate, and to see it through the eyes of Jesus.  I pray that I will never grow too tired, or cynical, or comfortable, to experience indignation in the face of yet another atrocity.
          
From the Maccabees to Jesus, and from Jesus to the Salvadoran martyrs, we have examples before us of those who persevered and paid the price.  Dare we pray to have that kind of subversive faith?   



Supplementary Reading
From lariat to laughter  by  Robert H. Schuller
 

I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will counsel you with my loving eye on you. – Psalm 32:8



O ne of the great men of American history is the legendary Will Rogers. His big ambition in life was to be a circus cowboy. He was finally given an opportunity to perform in New York but his whole career hinged on one trick—a lariat trick. He was so excited to be in New York and performing for a large audience where he hoped his rope trick would make him famous. But he was so nervous that he lost control at a peak point and got tangled up in his own lariat. Everybody laughed.

Instead of panicking, Will quipped, "Gettin’ tangled up in a rope ain't so bad—unless it's 'round your neck!'" Everybody laughed again and again.

In making this mistake, Will Rogers discovered a new talent in himself—the ability to make people laugh. And that discovery changed his destiny.

What talents have you discovered in yourself? How did you discover them?


For meditation/readings of the previous days/months , please click any of the following links:
http://his-ways-better-than-our-ways.blogspot.com/
http://www.mabuhayradio.com/sections/the-daily-bread.html
http://butuanglobalforum.org/cgi-bin/dboard/YaBB.pl?num=1229339492/220


 
Daily Mass and Gospel Meditation Broadcast (Tagalog) thru DWXI (5am Phil Time), pls click this link:  http://www.eradioportal.com/index.php?p=2&aid=1&sid=62#STS=g1jais7y.zk6

GOD BLESS US ALL!
O Theos Na Mas Evlogisi!
PRAY as if everything depended on HIM. ACT as if everything depended on YOU.
 





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Last Updated on Sunday, 15 November 2009 15:27
 

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